Diabetes and Yeast Infections: Get the Facts

Yeast infections occur when an overgrowth of a type of fungus known as candidiasis occurs in the vagina. They can happen to any woman, but they are especially common in women with diabetes. If you have diabetes, it’s important to make sure your gynecologist knows, so that he or she can help you manage your risk of yeast infections. Here are the facts you need to know.

High blood sugar levels mean an increase in yeast infections.

Diabetes causes blood sugar levels to rise. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer produces insulin after it is attacked by the immune system, so that body cannot convert glucose into energy, causing blood sugar levels to increase. With type 2 diabetes, the body cannot use insulin effectively to control blood glucose, allowing blood sugar to increase. With both types of diabetes, one of the effects of excess sugar is in the blood is yeast infections. The reason for this is that sugar feeds yeast. High blood sugar levels encourage an overgrowth of yeast that can affect multiple parts of the body, including the vagina.

Recurrent yeast infections are a symptom of diabetes.

There are many different things that can cause yeast infections, including medications, some birth control methods, and being pregnant. However, if you suddenly develop severe or recurring yeast infections, your gynecologist may recommend that you be screened for diabetes. Before being diagnosed with diabetes, yeast infections are a common symptom reported by women.

There are things you can do to reduce your risk of yeast infections.

If you have diabetes, following your treatment plan to keep your blood sugar levels in a healthy range will reduce the risk of yeast infections. Avoid using vaginal sprays, douches, or scented menstrual pads and tampons. Don’t sit around in wet bathing suits or workout clothes, and choose cotton underwear.

If you think you have yeast infection, make an appointment with Washington Surgi-Clinic for treatment today. For more information about yeast infection treatments in Washington, D.C., call (202) 659-9403.

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